Page 239 of 367 FirstFirst ... 139189229235236237238239240241242243249289339 ... LastLast
Results 2,381 to 2,390 of 3669

Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #2381
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa
    Posts
    554

    Default

    Years ago there was a madman sailor/innovator in Sausalito. His mid-twenty foot sloop deck and cabin top was riddled with various holes where he's moved the mast around, he tried a mizzen mast and even a Felucca- style rig. He must have had a warehouse full of "booms" and even had a version of Wylie's wishbone boom at one time. For a long time he had the boat rigged as a "staysail" sloop. The shortened mast was at the transom with a "forestay" down to the stem. The sail was a jib hoisted horizontally and sheeted to the cabin-top mainsheet track. He adjusted the sail by moving the mainsheet car. It actually worked fairly well when reaching up and down the Sausalito waterfront where it was pretty much "self-tending."

  2. #2382
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    "Everything that's old is new again." Not a Hobie 16. Thanks to William Letts Oliver, we have photos of catamaran DUSTER racing in 1894 on SF Bay. Can anyone identify the waterfront? I think DUSTER was a bit undercanvased in this photo, as her singlehanded skipper had flipped (and righted) his boat shortly before. That's the RC and spectators in the far right background on the Club deck.

    Name:  Duster.jpg
Views: 427
Size:  94.4 KB
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-01-2018 at 11:32 AM.

  3. #2383
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    2,932

    Default

    Happy New Year Skip!

    https://vimeo.com/239113354

  4. #2384
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    122

    Default

    It looks to me that DUSTER is sailing on the waterfront off Belvedere Cove. Corinthian YC (or present site of SFYC) in background.

  5. #2385
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skatzman View Post
    It looks to me that DUSTER is sailing on the waterfront off Belvedere Cove. Corinthian YC (or present site of SFYC) in background.
    Hi Steve, Happy New Year to you and DIANNE! Sorry, catamaran DUSTER is not finishing near Belvedere Cove or CYC, but you can guess again.

    By the way, no one has identified Sally Green as being the original head turning color of the 10 meter SALLY. So I am withdrawing chicken dinner prize at CBC for that piece of sailing trivia. The story is the original owner of SALLY asked his wife what color she wanted the new boat. She didn't really care much for sailing, looked down at her Ponds Cold Cream Jar lid, and said, "there, that color.."

    Name:  ponds.jpg
Views: 419
Size:  16.8 KB

    Z-Spar paints made Sally Green paint for many years, and it's still available by special order...it was a most beautiful color on a beautiful boat. I got to see her a lot, as SALLY was moored next door to my grandparent's house in Balboa before being donated to UCSantaCruz...

    A beautiful photo of restored SALLY, now painted white, is on SSS Forum page 236, post 2358, date 12/06/2017.
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-06-2018 at 08:53 PM.

  6. #2386
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    Sad news: ANNALISE, a Wylie 34, lovingly owned by Paul and Anne for 33 years, sunk at her slip in Gig Harbor, and is being scrapped...from the photo, it appears a below waterline hose detached. Reportedly the thru-hull was open... With the vibration of small diesel engines, checking hose clamps (I only see one) and hose tightness on fittings regularly is wise. The sad end of a well loved boat.

    Name:  Annalise2.jpg
Views: 311
Size:  54.9 KB

    Name:  Annalise1.jpg
Views: 309
Size:  40.1 KB
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-08-2018 at 12:05 PM.

  7. #2387
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alameda CA
    Posts
    346

    Default

    When I was a kid, one of my "jobs" whenever we went sailing [once the family boat had scaled up to having an inboard] was to open the raw water seacock when we got to the boat and close it before we left.
    Without fail; Every. Single. Freakin'. Time.
    Even when we went to the grocery store in Friday Harbor on the summer cruise... I remember that one because by that point I was a snotty teenager and argued that it seemed a bit over the top (or choicer words to that effect).
    Dad could be really old school.

    But I still won't leave the boat without closing all the seacocks.

    Thanks Dad.

    DH
    Last edited by DaveH; 01-08-2018 at 12:50 PM.

  8. #2388
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    Happy New Year Skip!
    https://vimeo.com/239113354
    Thanks, Bob! And Happy New Year to you.

    As an unapologetic romantic, seeing the Herreshoff "Fighting Forty" MARILEE sailing again after her second recent restoration is a magical treat. You see, my sister is also "Marilee" and she has a 8.5x11 sailing photo of her namesake hanging over her office desk.

    Name:  Marilee1.jpg
Views: 282
Size:  139.0 KB

    In an scene of pure serendipity, one recent night at the Throckmorton Theatre in Mill Valley, my sister Marilee and I ran into long time sailing friend Bill Barton from the iMP days. Bill was wearing a MARILEE crew shirt and when introduced to my sister, shed his shirt and presented it to her.

    A couple of years earlier I was making a pilgrimage to the Herreshoff Marine Museum in Bristol, R.I., where MARILEE was built in 1926. I happened to have learned the password (you don't pronounce Herreshoff with the "H", but rather HerrSoff,") and was told where I might find Halsey Herreshoff, Capt.Nat's grandson. I had some questions about the traditional green bottom paint and found Halsey's office across Burnside St., the door open but no Halsey..I peered inside and there were blue sail bags stacked ceiling high, all labeled "RUGOSA."

    RUGOSA is Halsey's NY 40, sistership to MARILEE. And RUGOSA, 65 feet overall, was swinging at her mooring just offshore where Halsey was probably tinkering down below. Here's RUGOSA and Halsey in a short video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RviVY7FCUPQ
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-09-2018 at 12:13 AM.

  9. #2389
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    As kids we spent significant time body surfing between the Wedge and Newport Pier. During those years, we never had an encounter with something live and dangerous.

    The recent capture of a 25 inch, rare, venomous yellow-bellied sea snake at Newport Beach is eye opening and possibly belies the new normal. Likely drawn north in search of food by warming ocean temps, this marine serpent was found in the surfline at 18th St.. It's short sharp fangs are capable of delivering extremely potent venom, although local herpetologists say it is usually a pretty mellow animal unless picked up.

    Name:  seasnake1.jpg
Views: 230
Size:  95.3 KB

    This is only the fifth Yellow-Belly (Pelamis platura,) found in S.Cal since 1972, when one washed up on a San Clemente Beach. Monday's snake was captured by marine biologists from the Pacific Marine Mammal Center, deemed sick, and euthanized to be studied. Poor snake.

    Water temperature in the vicinity of Monday's snake sighting was about 60 degrees F, a non-El Nino year. Maybe too cold for the Yellow-Belly, who got caught out of it's range, which is tropical waters of the Pacific and Indian Oceans.
    Yellow-Bellys are strictly pelagic, don't have scales, give birth at sea, have a flattened tail paddle, and never come ashore.

    Curiously, Yellow Bellys cannot exist in fresh water, but require fresh water to survive, drinking precipitation that collects on the surface of sea water.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-11-2018 at 05:27 PM.

  10. #2390
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,058

    Default

    Not sure why it took 11 months, but the National Center for Environmental Information, a division of NOAA, just this past week certified a 199 mph (173 knot) wind gust as the strongest wind ever recorded in California. The record was set at Alpine Meadows ski resort last February, at a private weather station atop the 8,637' local peak. Alpine is near the north west shore of Lake Tahoe.

    It is difficult to imagine wind of this strength, especially cold wind. I don't know what the wind chill factor would have been, because it is off the chart. Doesn't matter, because any human present not strapped to the ground would likely have been blown off the peak.

    Just for reference, here is the resident meteorologist atop New Hampshire's Mt. Washington Observatory attempting to stand in a mere 109 mph wind. Mt. Washington holds the record for the highest wind speed ever recorded in the Lower 48 at 231 mph, recorded on April 12, 1934.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wWrdwZpzvk

    Which begs the question: just how is wind speed of this velocity recorded, and how is the instrument positioned, maintained, and calibrated? Unless the instrument was tested in a wind tunnel with sophisticated instrumentation, it would seem accuracy would be a question, as it is for most off-the-shelf masthead cup type anemometers on boats.

    The most wind I've experienced was at the Mono Lake Ranger Station, where the westerly, downslope breeze was gusting solidly over 70 mph, with lulls in the 60's, and several big rig trucks along nearby Hwy 395 lay on their sides. Mono Lake, usually greenish/brown, was solid white with spume.

    I was also at sea in the "toughest Bermuda Race in history," the 1972 race to the Onion Patch, when the fleet crossed tracks with the tail end of Hurricane Agnes. Aboard the 68 foot ultra-light schooner NEW WORLD we had a close encounter with a water spout, and were down to storm canvas: storm jib and triple reefed main and still leaping off waves at 6-7 knots.

    This was the last "traditional" Bermuda Race, as no instrumentation was allowed. A sextant was useless in the wind and rain as we closed on Bermuda's fringing reef.... Here's a brief story by good friend Andy Mac of that Bermuda Race, when even mighty WINDWARD PASSAGE blew out sails and had rig damage. http://bermudarace.com/looking-back-...ildest-thrash/
    Last edited by sleddog; 01-15-2018 at 08:27 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •