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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3531
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Our friend from San Francisco Bay has won 4 Olympic medals, 2 Gold, in two distinct sports in 4 Olympics over 20 years. As well, this individual has successfully defended the America's Cup. I doubt there is anyone with such a record, male or female, nor such longevity.

    For a bowl of Marianne's Macapuno with pomegranate seed topping, who is this noted Bay Area personage, what were the Olympic sports, and what winning America's Cup yacht?
    Conn Findlay
    America's cup was Courageous
    Olympic Sports were sailing and rowing

  2. #3532
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    Mar 2018
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    Santa Cruz CA
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    I think a guy from the San Jose State PE department won a gold in the decathlon, as a Male , He called himself "Bruce" Jenner back then!?
    Last edited by Howard Spruit; 11-13-2019 at 09:47 PM. Reason: spelling

  3. #3533
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntsUiga View Post
    Conn Findlay
    America's cup was Courageous
    Olympic Sports were sailing and rowing
    Before we get too off track.

    One of the greatest watermen of all time, Duke Paoa Kahino Makoe Hulikohoa Kahanamoku, won 5 Olympic medals, including 3 Gold, in swimming between 1912 and 1924. Duke Kahanamoku also competed in the Olympics in waterpolo, and was an Olympian 20 years (1932) after his first Gold.

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    Then too, Mark Spitz raced two Transpacs.

    But Ants is the winner. Conn Findlay, of Bethel Island in the San Francisco Bay Delta, is the correct answer.

    Conn is a Cal Berkeley grad and four-time Olympic medalist, and one of the special few to medal in two distinct sports, winning Gold in rowing at the 1956 and the 1964 Summer Olympics, and Bronze in the 1960 Games.

    As Howard Spruit should know, himself being a Tempest sailor, in the 1976 Olympics, Conn Findlay was on the trapeze wire for Dennis Conner to win a Bronze medal in the Tempest two-man keelboat class. Unfortunately, with a Gold medal in reach, Conner picked the wrong side on the last weather leg and dropped to 3rd, depriving Conn of 3 Golds and earning him and Dennis Bronze instead.

    Conn, at 6'5", had amazing strength, coordination, and reach. His sailing skills were much in demand, and he could grind a winch and hoist a spinnaker faster than anyone. Conn was mast man aboard the 12 Meter COURAGEOUS, successfully defending the America's Cup in 1977 with loquacious "Capt. Outrageous" Ted Turner as skipper.

    Conn, a man of few words, was on the foredeck of COURAGEOUS during the 1977 America's Cup trials when Turner left the helm to Jobson and walked forward. Said Ted: ""I think we have a problem." (It involved the front end of the boat.) "Do you know what you did wrong?"

    Conn's succinct answer was, "'Yes." End of conversation, Turner was speechless for once, and walked aft, shaking his head.

    I've sailed many miles with Conn Findlay, and remember him as the best of shipmates. His boat design and building skills, and as coach to countless rowers at California colleges and up and down the Pacific Coast, meant Conn could do pretty much anything on the water. We sailed together on AMERICAN EAGLE with Turner, WINDWARD PASSAGE, and MERLIN.

    I will always remember on MERLIN, the 3rd day of the Transpac, when the propane regulator broke and we had no stove for the rest of the race. Early the next morning I smelled bacon cooking as we went on dawn watch. There was Conn, bent double in the port tunnel, frying bacon and eggs on the hot engine as it charged batteries....

    Conn Findlay will never have a bronze statue on Waikiki Beach like Duke Kahanamoku. Nor make millions from endorsements like Mark Spitz. But as a sailor and shipmate I revere, Conn is the best.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 11-14-2019 at 12:35 PM.

  4. #3534
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    Dec 2012
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    Alameda CA
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    It took awhile for the penny to drop... I've been chewing on a vague memory from high school rowing in Seattle.
    I could clearly remember one of the Pocock "fours" in the boathouse was named the CONN FINDLAY, but couldn't figure out why that would be, and how that name would end up on a rowing shell in Seattle.

    Took a bit of googling... turns out one Arthur D(an) Ayrault was Conn's partner in the 1956 Gold Medal pair-with-cox.

    25+ years later, Dan Ayrault was the headmaster at my high school; his daughter Megan was in my class (and in fact was my date to sophomore prom).
    That has to be to be the origin of "The Findlay" shell, in which I won 2 regional lightweight championships.

    Smalller and smaller and smaller...
    Last edited by DaveH; 11-14-2019 at 10:54 AM.

  5. #3535
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    Excitement ahead for the "raucous" conclusion of the Baja Ha Ha tomorrow at Cabo San Lucas?

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  6. #3536
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    New Boat 4 Dazzler. It's always a happy event to welcome a boat to the SSS fleet. In this case Wyliecat 30 #18, as yet un-renamed, will soon join the fleet in Brickyard Cove.

    DAZZLER's experience in his previous Wyliecat 30 is a good match, and bodes well for everyone.

    Sweet.

    Welcome back DAZZLER! Looking forward to seeing you and Sue on the water.

    ~sleddog
    Last edited by sleddog; 11-20-2019 at 03:42 PM.

  7. #3537
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    "A Man, A Dog, a Boat."

    Thanks to Annie for this photo of a Beetlecat in a pastoral setting at sunset during a dogwalk at Santa Cruz Harbor earlier this week.

    The first Beetle catboat was designed and built in New Bedford, MA in 1921 by John Beetle and family for their children. More of this class began to appear along the shores of New England and currently over 4000 have been built.

    In 98 years since the first Beetlecat, the design has remained unchanged. The Beetlecat is 12ft-4in long and is a design adaptation of the larger Cape Cod cats used for fishing in shoal water. The wide beam, with the rudder not extending below the bottom of the hull and a centerboard, are features that lend Beetlecats to shallow waters and being beached. The six foot beam makes it unusually stable and gives it a large carrying capacity.

    Beetlecats are built of wood, with oak frames and cedar planking. With no ballast, the Beetlecat is unsinkable. The large decked area forward on the boat means spray falls on the deck rather than inside the boat. The rig has the mast well forward, cat boat style, and uses a gaff rig, If the tiller is released, the boat will head into the wind and stop. This feature makes it an ideal boat for youngsters, and a near sister, a "Snowbird," was my first boat.

    Snowbirds were the Olympic Class dinghy in 1932. Their course was inside Los Angeles Harbor, off Cabrillo Beach, in "Hurricane Gulch. No, I wasn't there.
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    My Snowbird, #335, was so heavy it once broke the yacht club hoist. I was well familiar with the back of the fleet. Thank goodness it didn't ever rain in S.Cal during the summer ...the cotton sail would have shrunk a foot on all dimensions before growing mildew.

    Unlike Beetlecats, which continue to thrive, there's only one wooden Snowbird left, in a museum.

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    Last edited by sleddog; 11-22-2019 at 09:43 AM.

  8. #3538
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    Ants was our most recent trivia winner. And we've shared Marianne's Macapuno ice cream with pomegranate seed topping and TJ's Triple Ginger Snaps with Ants and Marsha here at Capitola Boat Club and Maritime Museum (CBC) the weekend they were running the Monterey Half Marathon. I hope Ants' blister has healed!

    For a Holidays' taste treat, and brief demonstration of a safety requirement you may not have seen, we need the answer to the below question which occurred onboard WILDFLOWER, my custom Tom Wylie 27' sloop, in 2007, 200 meters seaward of the Crow's Nest Restaurant at Santa Cruz Harbor breakwater.

    TWS = True Wind Speed. AWS = Apparent Wind Speed BS= Boat Speed

    Onboard WILDFLOWER, AWS was 0 (Zero) and BS was 4 knots. Additionally the crew in the cockpit smelled french fries. However no french fries were onboard.

    What was the TWS? Bonus for a brief explanation.

    As always, if having guessed incorrectly and no correct answer appears in the 24 hours following the original posting, go ahead and guess again. The original was posted this evening,11/23/19, at 6 pm .
    Last edited by sleddog; 11-23-2019 at 07:03 PM.

  9. #3539
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    I'm going to postulate that Wildflower was in the Santa Cruz Harbor channel, after a winter storm. There was so much runoff , and it was an ebbing tide, that there was 4 knots of current whisking Wildflower past the Crows Nest resturant...
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  10. #3540
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    Sep 2008
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    Saratoga
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    The wind was coming from the North at 4 knots instead of from the West, Wildflower was moving South at 4 knots, and the french fries were from the Crow's Nest?

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