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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3551
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobJ View Post
    The seven clutches were for five halyards: Main, jib 1, jib 2 (also used for a pole lift), spin 1, and spin 2 (non-stretch for the code zero). The other two clutches were for the spinny tack line, and one shared between the jib's inhauler and the solent stay tail.

    The three cam cleats were for the cunningham and two vang tails. I forgot four more cam cleats - one for each genoa car adjuster and two for the snuffer up/down lines.
    The way I look at it, every string is something to tug on that might make the boat go fasterer!

    - rob/beetle

  2. #3552
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    Sep 2008
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    SF Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Though I haven't seen Tom's boat, I'll take a guess at what all those lines are...
    Sled got it pretty much right, but what he didn't known is that my new boat has two halyards. There's some rigging variation among the WC30's and I expect to yet make a few changes.

    Deceptively "simple"... As Pat alluded, it's not as simple as it looks. When I sold the former DAZZLER, I warned the new owner to expect at least a season's learning curve. He was not patient.

    I've had the boat less than a week and I'm going to enjoy the process of making it my own. There will be some changes.

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    Tom P.
    Wyliecat 30 - DAZZLER
    Last edited by Dazzler; 11-25-2019 at 10:06 PM.

  3. #3553
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    Sep 2008
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    SF Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Though I haven't seen Tom's boat...
    The likely reason the upper lifeline is low on the aft pushpit is to facilitate the mainsheet passing cleanly on gybes.
    Gybing a Wyliecat on a blustery summer afternoon is a religious experience. One has to be a believer that it will all work out. Its’s properly called a “Hudson River Gybe” (look it up). The boom is about 20’ long so that means there is a lot of free running sheet flying across the back end. Trust me, if there’s anything to catch on, the sheet will find it.
    Last edited by Dazzler; 11-25-2019 at 10:56 PM.
    Tom P.

  4. #3554
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Santa Rosa
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    553

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    Sled, It isn't so much that the mainsheet (which is doubled and nearly 30' long on a running jibe) catches. It's more that the mainsheet drags down on the top safety line with standard stanchions when running. The lower pushpit and resulting sloping lifelines allow the mainsheet to extend out without "humping" over the top safety line. I've decided to keep the original stanchions and live with things. I've also wondered if lower stanchions would comply with a strict interpretation of offshore safety requirements. It is important for a top lifeline across the transom to keep the sheet from snagging.

    On a jibe, the mainsheet is completely unloaded as it crosses the boat. I guide all that slack line across with one hand as it passes through the cockpit. And let go before it takes up. A Wyliecat jibe looks dramatic, but it's actually pretty controlled, considering how much sail, mainsheet, and wishbone boom is swinging thru an arc that's about 50' wide. The sail/battens snapping is loud and frightening to newcomers. It's a good idea to keep bodies in front of the tiller however; getting pinned against those pesky lifelines at the jibe's conclusion is painful (don't ask). The wishbone boom is high enough that getting conked by it isn't going to happen. You'd be swept over the side by the lower part of the sail instead if you were to stand up during a tack or jibe.

    Jibing in the middle of dark nights with 25+ knot wind and 15 foot swells on the way to Hawaii is another jibe story, however. For another day.

    You're invited to come sailing some windy day. Pat Broderick

  5. #3555
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    Sep 2007
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    Capitola,CA
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    2,048

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dazzler View Post
    Gybing a Wyliecat on a blustery summer afternoon is a religious experience. One has to be a believer that it will all work out. It's properly called a “Hudson River Gybe” (look it up). The boom is about 20’ long so that means there is a lot of free running sheet flying across the back end. Trust me, if there’s anything to catch on, the sheet will find it.
    Thanks all for educational elucidations, especially gybing techniques and terminology on catboats. DAZZLER wins the trivia prize for "Hudson River Gybe" and I didn't even have to ask the question, hihi.

    Vital to a traditional Hudson River Gybe is something called a "Patent Horse." Anyone know what that is and where you might see one?

    The photo of Tom Wylie and someone else shows something cool about Wyliecats of all sizes.

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    You can cruise around all day under sail, with Aunt Gertrude and the dog, in pretty much any breeze, gybing fearlessly in the Slot, without even having to take the mainsail cover off...Just hoist the sail so the first batten is wishbone height, and off you go, sailing out of the slip faster than I could say "Hudson River Gybe" and "Bob's Your Uncle."

    I haven't heard Wylieguy's jibing story. Sounds inspirational and we might learn even more, which is one reason I like to post here. If it was me considering "jibing in the middle of dark nights with 25+ knot wind and 15 foot swells on the way to Hawaii..." I think I'd consider lowering the main to the above mentioned first batten height and "gybe ho!" to anyone listening. That technique might have helped win the 2018 SHTP.

    DKW would say "you're all wusses."
    "Coach raced a Wyliecat30 to Hawaii, and singlehanded back without an autopilot."

    Who the heck is "Coach," and what does he know we don't?
    Last edited by sleddog; 11-26-2019 at 06:29 AM.

  6. #3556
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    Look at all the pretty colors!

    Last night's graveyard shift National Weather Service forecaster must have gotten bored and pulled out his colored pencils.

  7. #3557
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    Sep 2008
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    SF Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wylieguy View Post
    I've also wondered if lower stanchions would comply with a strict interpretation of offshore safety requirements.

    Jibing in the middle of dark nights with 25+ knot wind and 15 foot swells on the way to Hawaii is another jibe story, however. For another day.
    Pat, I considered the implications of the lowered stanchions. I think you are right that they don’t meet the lifeline height requirements for offshore. The boat also has perfectly lovely vinyl coated wire lifelines. Jackie assumed I was going to change them to “cheese cutters.” I expressed my opinion that the requirement is aimed at people who don’t know how to maintain their boats. For now, I have no intention of going offshore.

    We look forward to reading your jibing story.
    Tom P.

  8. #3558
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    Sep 2008
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    SF Bay
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post

    Vital to a traditional Hudson River Gybe is something called a "Patent Horse." Anyone know what that is and where you might see one?

    DKW would say "you're all wusses."
    "Coach raced a Wyliecat30 to Hawaii, and singlehanded back without an autopilot."

    Who the heck is "Coach," and what does he know we don't?
    You’ll particularly find Patent Horses on gaff rigged sailboats. I’m trying to remember where I’ve seen them locally. Maybe GAS LIGHT or ALMA.

    And of course “Coach” is WMT, Jr.
    Tom P.

  9. #3559
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by sleddog View Post
    Name:  NWS.png
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    Look at all the pretty colors!

    Last night's graveyard shift National Weather Service forecaster must have gotten bored and pulled out his colored pencils.
    Yes, well here in southern Oregon we are tying things down. House roof is next.

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  10. #3560
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by WBChristie View Post
    Yes, well here in southern Oregon we are tying things down. House roof is next.
    Gary is not kidding about tying down the house roof. There's an historical meterological "bomb cyclone" with direct aim at Brookings, Oregon due to arrive this afternoon with storm force winds 55 knots and higher, waves to 36 feet.

    The weathermen are bug-eyed about this rapidly deteriorating weather situation featuring a precipitous drop in barometric pressure to 978 mb.. Hang on, Gary!

    https://cliffmass.blogspot.com/

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