Page 360 of 381 FirstFirst ... 260310350356357358359360361362363364370 ... LastLast
Results 3,591 to 3,600 of 3806

Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3591
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,361

    Default

    [QUOTE=sleddog;24985]
    If you are looking for a very powerful aluminum cutter .... This is your ship, just arrived single handed from Tahiti to Anacortes, WA in 27 days, and going up for sale.

    My my!That boat is beautiful. And very clean. Much too clean for my taste. I prefer the look of a boat that has been there and back, and kept her skipper safe the whole way:

    Name:  Moli.JPG
Views: 238
Size:  195.2 KB
    Last edited by Philpott; 12-17-2019 at 06:43 PM.

  2. #3592
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,137

    Default

    More INTERMEZZO II, an aluminum, "go anywhere" 62 foot cutter by the Dashews in the 1980's. Recently singlehanded Tahiti to Anacortes, WA in 27 days and soon to be for sale.

    Flush decks and high freeboard was unusual at the time.

    Both MOLI and INTERMEZZO II are aluminum. If you are going into harm's way, aluminum is probably the best material for the hull one could choose.

    Name:  Intermezzo II 6.jpg
Views: 228
Size:  12.7 KB

    Name:  Intermezzo II 3.jpg
Views: 225
Size:  55.3 KB

    Name:  Intermezzo II 4.jpg
Views: 231
Size:  72.0 KB

    Name:  Intermezzo II 5.jpg
Views: 221
Size:  70.5 KB

  3. #3593
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    3,031

    Default

    It has a nuker and a juicer - even I could cook on that boat!

  4. #3594
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,361

    Default

    That is a beautiful cabin. Kindof like Dura Mater’s, except bigger, cleaner and with a headliner. And a stove. And more expensive bedding. And ... okay, a few other inconsequential amenities for the cruiser class.

    Moli’s cabin, on the other hand, is a sailor’s dream.

  5. #3595
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Intermission View Post
    I'm guessing #4, #6, #7, and #8.
    Hi Brad,
    You have guessed the 3 correct answers, #4,#7, and #8, and your brandy will be waiting for your visitation to CBC.

    #4 is correct as "Red Sky" can happen in both the N and S Hemispheres between 30 to 60 degrees latitude, but not in the tropics. This is because weather systems travel West to East between 30-60, and East to West in the tropics. You need a West to East weather system to produce a Red Sky.

    #7 is correct because Red Sky happens as the early morning sun shines from the eastern sky upward into the clouds of an approaching low as a high pressure departs eastward and the low approaches from the west. (Red Sky at Morning, Sailors Take Warning." The opposite can be true at sunset: the low's clouds depart eastward and fair weather from a high approaches from the west ("Red Sky at Night, Sailors Delight.")

    #8 is theoretically correct because if you don't have clouds, you can't have red skies. I might argue this point. I have seen red skies at sunset without clouds during 1991 and '92 following the cataclysmic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines. Fine dust entered the atmosphere from the eruption and was carried around the world. I also saw a red sky once looking east at night off the west coast of Baja. It looked like somebody had dropped the bomb and the earth was ending. After research into this strange phenomena it was determined to be the Northern Lights..
    Last edited by sleddog; 12-18-2019 at 07:23 PM.

  6. #3596
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Saratoga
    Posts
    153

    Default

    #6 was a stretch, but once in a decade or two, sometimes red skys can peek under the leading edge. But no, not square in the trough. My bad.
    Last edited by Intermission; 12-18-2019 at 07:26 PM. Reason: peek, not peak

  7. #3597
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,137

    Default

    Beginning this time of year, I begin to be asked about emergency steering. The first thing I say to prospective participants is this:

    Whatever emergency steering (ES) is chosen should be able to be fitted offshore and in a seaway. It should work at speed using white sails balanced on a reach and with twin jibs downwind. The emergency steering system should also work with a tiller pilot and/or wind vane, and get you to the finish line before the race deadline. Otherwise your belt buckle is for naught.

    ES is an issue for everyone. I'm pleased to see Jackie organizing an on-the-water gathering for Jan. 11 & 12th at RYC.

    Some solutions are easier and cheaper than others depending on transom configuration and pocket book. Some worry less about weight, complexity, and speed and say "I'll use a drogue to steer."

    I do know everyone's ES works in theory. In practice, less so.

    The problem is keeping the back of the boat at the back and the bow pointed at the destination. Easier said than done. It involves some sort of lateral resistance aft to keep the stern inline.

    The resistance provided can be a spinnaker pole, a drogue, anchor chain or milk crate. The trade off is the more the drag, the slower the boat speed. Going slow for a long distance gets old fast.

    Emergency steering doesn't have to be mounted exactly on centerline. Transoms are often thin laminates and structure needs to be considered often with hefty back up plates

    The SC-70 PYEWACKET had a cool and tested ES rudder that mounted on a transom track. Their main rudder went away in a TransAtlantic race and the ES rudder was quickly deployed and steered nicely at speeds to 9 knots. Robbie wanted to go faster, so they set their spinnaker, the boat jumped to 12 knots, and the transom track ripped off.

    If I were an inspector, which I'm not, I'd want a video of one's ES being mounted in the ocean in wind and seas greater than 15 knots. I'd also want to see the boat tacking and/or gybing, and then steering a couple of miles in a reasonably straight direction.

    Two after thoughts. One is carrying a substantial bung to pound into a rudder tube to knock out a damaged or bent rudder shaft.

    The other is the goal of getting downwind with twin jibs and no rudder.. For a sprit boat to accomplish this, two poles are needed, and two butt end attachment points on the front of the mast. How many sprit boats have a mast attachment point? Slim to none.

    Questions? I can be reached at eight3one-four75-zero278
    Last edited by sleddog; 12-23-2019 at 04:00 PM.

  8. #3598
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,361

    Default Aforementioned On-The-Water Gathering

    Last edited by Philpott; 12-23-2019 at 05:04 PM.

  9. #3599
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Capitola,CA
    Posts
    2,137

    Default

    Just about every nautical Christmas Card with Santa has Capt. Claus doing something really stupid: speeding on a jet ski, sailing hugely by-the-lee, overloaded akin to a Mexican panga...

    It appears this year the Coast Guard has gotten into the act.
    Name:  Santa 1.jpg
Views: 111
Size:  22.4 KB

    I prefer a painting of a lovely schooner boiling across the Diamond Head Finish Line.

    Name:  Goodwill2.jpg
Views: 108
Size:  90.7 KB

    Happy Holidaze All!

  10. #3600
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Bodfish, CA
    Posts
    145

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    The previous seminars have had delightful, informative video documentation. Those were easier since the seminars were inside at a single location. The demonstrations during this event will be dispersed aboard every entry.

    Is there any likelihood of a summary video? (Certainly, it would be more challenging to produce).

    Ants

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •