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Thread: New Boat 4 Sled

  1. #3831
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    On a pre-dawn walk this morning, the waning moon, Saturn, and Jupiter formed a distinct triangle in the southern sky. Offshore, the bright lights of 20 squid boats were reflected in the waters of Monterey Bay, "the Calamari Capitol of the World." These bright lights lure squid to the surface to be surrounded by giant purse seine nets, then unloaded on the a Monterey Wharf.

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    Since opening April 1, it is a very lucrative season for squidders. They will land about 118,000 tons of squid before the season is closed, worth about $33 million. How much longer this can continue, the largest fishing industry in California, is unknown. Many remember the crash of the sardine and anchovy industries.

    A dirty little secret is almost all local squid is shipped to Asia for cleaning and and processing. Then, after higher quality squid is sold, remains are refrozen and loaded on a container ship for the long trip back back to the U.S.

    Despite the large carbon footprint—along with a concerns of by-catch and habitat damage—store and restaurant bought squid along our coast is considered a “Good Alternative” by Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program, which rates the sustainability by where and how it is caught.

    According to those who know, over-processing is the worst thing one can do to fresh squid. "Reimported squid is rinsed too thoroughly and is often bleached, so the delicate seafood loses its natural brininess. “It’s sad to see much of our local squid shipped away.”

    Sal Tringali, a third-generation squid processor at Salinas-based Monterey Fish Co., finds it distressing to see most locals shun squid. “People today don’t know what they’re missing,” says Tringali, wistful for the days when the town celebrated squid, particularly at the now-defunct Monterey Squid Festival.
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-10-2020 at 03:34 PM.

  2. #3832
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    There is a passage in Thomas Steinbeck’s novel In The Shadow Of The Cypress that describes going out from the beach with the early 1900’s Monterey squid fleet. His description of cooking squid and rice cakes on a small charcoal grill, in a skiff, at night on the bay, was fabulous.

  3. #3833
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    From the NZ Herald's Science Writer Jamie Morton on June 10, 2020

    Monster waves in the Southern Ocean that have already been shown to reach as high as eight-story buildings will grow larger and more frequent under climate change, scientists report.

    Extreme waves in the wild and windswept ocean below New Zealand, stretching across notorious latitudes dubbed the "roaring 40s", "furious 50s" and "screaming 60s", already pose big risks to ships.

    When the HMNZS OTAGO met some stretching more than 20m high in 2017, the 370 toot, 1900-tonne offshore patrol vessel came close to capsizing, with 75 people on board. Here is a short video of OTAGO.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ET9nv1jpghY

    The following year, the largest wave ever recorded in the Southern Hemisphere - a 23.8m giant that formed in the thick of a huge, deep storm - was measured by a buoy moored off Campbell Island.

    During the depths of winter, these waves were enormous, averaging more than 5m, regularly exceeding 10m - and sometimes likely reaching more than 25m, or the equivalent height of 16 cars stacked on top of each other.

    Anything more than 20m high is highly hazardous to vessels - waves that climbed to 14m forced the HMNZS Wellington to turn around part-way to the Subantarctic islands in 2014 - and ships tend to negotiate heavy seas by sailing head-on into the direction the waves are coming from.

    Fortunately, there was little shipping traffic in the ocean; what vessels are operating range from icebreakers and research boats to fishing vessels and small cruise liners.

    One recent study found that extreme waves in the ocean had grown by 30cm - or 5 per cent - in just the past three decades, all while the region had grown stormier, and even gustier, with extreme winds strengthening by 1.5m a second.

    Now, a new study has found that a warming planet will cause stronger storm winds triggering larger and more frequent extreme waves over the next 80 years - with largest increases shown in the Southern Ocean.

    The University of Melbourne researchers simulated Earth's changing climate under different wind conditions, recreating thousands of simulated storms to evaluate the magnitude and frequency of extreme events.

    The study found that if global emissions are not curbed there will be an increase of up to 10 per cent in the frequency and magnitude of extreme waves in extensive ocean regions.

    In contrast, researchers found there would be a significantly lower increase where effective steps are taken to reduce emissions and dependence on fossil fuels.

    In both scenarios, the largest increase in magnitude and frequency of extreme waves is in the Southern Ocean.

    They found the magnitude of a one-in 100-year significant wave height event increased by five to 15 per cent over the ocean by the century, compared to the 1979 to 2005 period.

    The North Atlantic, meanwhile, showed a decrease of five to 15 per cent at low to mid, but an increase at high latitudes of around 10 per cent.

    The extreme significant wave height in the North Pacific increases at high latitudes by five to 10 per cent.

    One of the paper's authors, Professor Ian Young, warned that more storms and extreme waves would result in rising sea levels and damage to infrastructure.

    "Around 290 million people across the world already live in regions where there is a one per cent probability of flood every year," Young said.

    "An increase in the risk of extreme wave events may be catastrophic, as larger and more frequent storms will cause more flooding and coastline erosion."

    Lead researcher Alberto Meucci said the study showed that the Southern Ocean region is significantly more prone to extreme wave increases with potential impact to Australian, Pacific and South American coastlines by the end of 21st century.

    "The results we have seen present another strong case for reduction of emissions through transition to clean energy if we want to reduce the severity of damage to global coastlines."

    The research comes as New Zealand scientists have been getting a much clearer picture of the Southern Ocean's extremes with wave buoys deployed by science-based consultancy MetOcean Solutions.

    The ocean currently sucks up more than 40 per cent of the carbon dioxide we produce, acting as a temporary climate-change buffer by slowing down the accumulation of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere.

    Yet the same westerly winds that play a critical role in regulating its storing capacity are now threatening its future as a CO2 bank, by bringing deep carbon-rich waters up to the surface.

    Many climate models have already predicted that the westerly winds overlying the ocean would get stronger if atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations continued to rise.

    Niwa marine physicist Dr Craig Stevens said the new findings had important implications for how we in New Zealand viewed our coastal ocean over the coming century.

    "Being a very maritime nation, a lot of our infrastructure, and way of life, is connected to and influenced by the ocean around us," he said.

    "So advanced awareness for planning authorities, and the processes to take the information seriously, is vital."

    Stevens said there would be some impacts from these changes over the coming decades that are difficult to forecast - especially around how coastal ecosystems and cultural values respond.

    "The waves and changing sea level will affect coastal sediment and erosion patterns as well as wave exposure for marine plants and animals living along these coasts," he said.

    "Also there are some feedback loops where a changed wave climate will affect heat and CO2 transfer."

    It was also known, he added, models and observations didn't always match – especially around extreme events.

    "So we certainly need more data to clarify these sorts of predictions. This is especially true over the Southern Ocean where very large waves build up and so extreme conditions are frequently possible," he said.

    "It is definitely motivation to gather more data in the Southern Ocean, where most of the heat captured by the planet is stored, on a range of climate processes and better understand how they affect all of us in Aotearoa New Zealand."
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-11-2020 at 06:34 AM.

  4. #3834
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    On my way home from Santa Cruz Harbor to CBC this morning I passed two points of interest. The first was the SC Harbor "Derelict Dock" on the west side near the old Aldo's deck. Because the cost of live aboard, insurance, maintenance, bottom cleaning, and other expenses associated with owning a boat often exceed the dream, vessels are being abandoned, both in the harbor and at anchor off the Wharf.

    Ultimately these "derelicts" will likely be dismantled and put in the dumpster, as many already have been. At the head of the line is a Catalina 27 and 22 foot powerboat. The Catalina has already been derigged and stripped of equipment. Also being evaluated are a Ranger 23, an aluminum skiff, a Banshee, a Frisco Flyer and a Wylie-34. The Ranger 23 would be a good singlehanded boat for SF Bay, and looks like it could be ready to go with a little TLC. Don't call me. But the SC Harbormaster, Blake, might know what's going on with their accumulating fleet. FYI: if you take over an abandoned boat, it must be removed from the harbor immediately.

    Also spotted was a new piece of shiny red equipment, a fire truck with a telescoping boom that could be extended to 100 feet horizontal or vertical. The Central Fire District boys were experimenting with which buttons to push on their new toy and had the boom horizontal out into the fog, with a rescue stretcher and fireman dangling over the 90 foot cliff just above surf line.

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    Many beach front restaurants are opening, with a new twist. Parking has been converted to outdoor dining for takeouts. One detail being worked out: no one thought ahead about an abundance of trash that has overwhelmed the trash receptacles, never mind a public afraid to touch the swinging lid doors on trash cans.

    While crows look on, gulls are having a field day picking through the discarded wrappers, plates, and cups. I had to step over a dead rat on the sidewalk. Not sure I will be recommending the Capitola outdoor dining experience anytime soon.
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-11-2020 at 11:39 AM.

  5. #3835
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    Condolences to AlanH on his recent traffic assault. Can't believe after Alan was rear ended, totaling his truck and breaking the rear window with his head, the woman had the nerve to attempt to drive on without stopping to render aid. Unbelievable. Wishing you a fast recovery, Alan.

    Most days I commute 10 miles RT on my much modified, 30 year old, mountain bike It is always an adventure, mostly on city streets and a constant challenge in navigation, reflexes, and balance. Every second requires attention and anticipation. Before leaving I evaluate wind, weather, and stability. Too much weight up high in my back pack can cause handling difficulties.

    Though Santa Cruz has won a Gold Award for being bike friendly, I would beg to disagree. Local bike lanes are almost always hazardous, with uneven pavement/asphalt transitions, pot holes, black berry vines, eucalyptus berries, construction signs, low branches, parked cars, roadkill, oncoming skateboarders, beer cans. You name it, I've seen it in local bike lanes.

    Using sailing skills, I've sought out, and mentally marked, "local knowledge," traffic patterns, back alleys and paths. And though I have good lights and reflectors, I try to not ride at night.

    As Howard Spruit's father reminds us, "anticipate what's going to happen two blocks ahead."

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    Beats driving.
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-16-2020 at 11:07 AM.

  6. #3836
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    Christine and I enjoyed riding along East Cliff Dr. when it was closed to cars due to the slide. The rest of Santa Cruz and Capitola is a mix of nice paths and shear terror intersections.
    Marin has the same problem with a lot of riders and poor planning on how to separate the cars and bikes.

  7. #3837
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    On Nextdoor I recently advertised a free Hobie-16 mast that could be "converted to a flagpole." The result was slightly unusual and definitely serendipitous.

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    Within minutes I was contacted by a Santa Cruz couple into a multi-year restoration of a 1750 home in Scotland, situated on a hill overlooking the Village of Nairn, near Inverness, on Moray Firth. They badly wanted a flagpole to fly a large St.Andrews Cross above their new digs, once a laird's house with 55 acres of pasture, stables, and forest on the grounds.

    This provoked my interest, and as it didn't take much to convert the salvaged Hobie mast into a proper flagpole, I picked up my tools and set to work. Yesterday the couple appeared at CBC to pick up their flag pole which was then to be loaded into a 40' container of household goods for shipment from Port of Oakland to the UK via container ship. I was ready to take notes.

    It seems they had won "Knock Grena," aka "Househill House" sight unseen at auction. It came "a bit rough" not having had maintenance in 250 years, had 8 bedrooms and equal number of fireplaces and chimneys, a kitchen in the basement, and a family of ghosts.

    https://realla-media.freetls.fastly....aUFPXBGJlB3v8w

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    There was much history to share....But to make a long story short, a 7 foot St. Andrews Cross, blue with a white diagonal cross, also called a Saltire, will be flying from their new flagpole on a sunny hill above Nairn on Moray Firth. A Saltire is the historic Scottish flag, first flown in 1512, making it one of the oldest flags in the world. And St. Andrew is of course the patron saint of Scotland.

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    Not a bad new location for a lonely Hobie 16 mast previously hanging from the rafters of Capitola Boat Club and Maritime Museum.
    Last edited by sleddog; 06-17-2020 at 09:05 AM.

  8. #3838
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    Thanks, Skip. My upper back is a little sore this morning, as in about what I'd expect a day or two after competing at a Highland Games, or having a multi-lift one-rep-max session in the gym. We are going camping next week and when we get back the "new truck" search will begin.

    I'm enjoying your tale of the Hobie mast. There are Victorian estates for sale for what we would consider to be preposterous prices, all over Scotland. I've eyeballed a few, but they often need a hundred thousand or more dollars of renovation to be really livable. Also, the Victorians liked to build houses with lots of little rooms and hallways, which is a very different notion of house construction than we are used to, today.

    Here's an example.

    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property...-60220732.html

    Victorian mansion for about $600K...within easy driving distance of Inverness and the harbor, or keep your boat at the harbor at Nairn. Go up the hills the other way, and half an hour later, you're sipping whisky at any of the world-renowned distilleries on the Speyside.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  9. #3839
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    I, personally have thought very hard about buying this...

    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property...-85756490.html



    which is actually a flat...an apartment made up of half of the house. Since we wouldn't be living there all the time, that leaves the people in the other flat around, keeping an eye on things. Yet it's big enough that we could live there, full time if something happened in the USA and we had to move.

    It's a 15 minute drive around the head of the Holy Loch to the marina at Sandbank, where the Piper was built and where the only strong concentration of Pipers is. Five minutes beyond Sandbank is the town of Dunoon, home of the Cowal Highland Games. There's incredible cruising along the west coast of Scotland, and active racing along the Clyde estuary. From Dunoon, it's a 35 minute ferry ride across the Clyde to the ferry stop at Gourock, and from there a half hour drive into Glasgow if we needed a dose of the BBC symphony, or I wanted to volunteer at the Gal Gael.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  10. #3840
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    BTW, Skip and others, I think you all might be pretty interested in the Gal Gael.

    https://www.galgael.org/

    The Gal Gael is a nonprofit organization devoted to developing traditional Scottish skills, and the primary one is woodworking and boatbuilding, in the poorest, roughest neighborhood in Glasgow. After the shipbuilding industry collapsed, Glasgow took a serious turn for the worse. In the late 1970's Gal Gaels founder, Colin MacLeod got the idea that he could change communities by restoring pride in traditional crafts. The impetus for forming Gal Gael was actually very mundane...it was a community effort brought together to fight the extension of a highway that would have split the neighborhood. It grew from there.

    Colin Macleod...

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    About the boats...

    https://www.nationalhistoricships.or...-trust-glasgow

    Gal Gael has built a couple of birlinns, but honestly, their biggest "boat" impact, is probably the production of Saint Ayles skiffs, designed by Ian Oughtred. There are coastal rowing clubs all over Scotland now, and they use scores of Saint Ayles skiffs.

    https://scottishcoastalrowing.org/20...to-crane-2017/

    video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0EMXAmBqji4


    I think I've written about Gal Gael in your thread, before....
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

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