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Thread: windvanes

  1. #31
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    Jan 2010
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    Good comments, Mr. Paine
    One more minor addition that I might add: The servo pendulum vanes that I have used, seem to work fine with a "normal" distance of 18 inches from tiller post to steering lines attachment point on the tiller. However, I found that there are times when this tiller attachment point could stand a change under certain conditions. If the attachment distance were shortened, the rudder would achieve a greater steering angle as the lines from the pendulum pulled the tiller over. Conversely, if less rudder swing were desired, the tiller attachment point could be moved farther from the rudder post. Might be better in lite air? Anyway, experimentation will possibly improve one's experience with the vane steering. I added a 12" piece of genoa track to my tiller, with the steering lines led to a "car" which could be moved fore and aft on the tiller. Thus, I am able to vary the attachment in an attempt to improve my vane's performance in varying wind and sea conditions. This is sort of "guilding the lily", perhaps, but it's fun to experiment. In another vein, pun intended, I do not feel that servo pendulum vanes and wheel steering are very compatible. The vane might only provide 6 inches of movement P & S at the tiller, which will give the rudder a good swing. Turning the wheel attachment drum 6 inches along its circumference will not swing the rudder nearly as far. It will generally steer fine up wind, but "run out of rudder" when used downwind. This may not be a problem with all boats, but I know it is with many wheel steering installations.

  2. #32
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    Jan 2010
    Location
    Honolulu
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    228

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    good comments sdpaine. and nice math/ equations/ science to flush out the heresay. I still have a hard time believing the vane's drag only slows the boat down .012 knots. after a lot of sailing on small boats with wind vanes and without, i personally believe it's more than that but i don't have the math or science to back that up. we will respectfully disagree. without differing opinions, this thread/ conversation would be boring.

    you are absolutely right though about the weight of the panel/ weight of fuel/ electricity budget, etc. it's the million dollar question on small boats and small budgets. in 2012 SHTP, Ruben and I both left on Moore's and only had solar for charging. we had a cloudy year and ended up mostly hand steering to hawaii which was f'ing miserable, and a Navik would have been really sweet to have on the transom!

    horses for courses, we all set up our boats how we see fit, but this is a good discussion. thanks for the input.

  3. #33
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    Jan 2010
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    OK. So the drag of whatever a windvane appendage amounts to, it is still more than NO DRAG. You just decide whether putting up with the drag is worth the benefit of less electricity needed to accomplish the mission. I think I stopped using the Atoms vane around my 3rd or 4th SHTP. Simply decided the auto pilot does a better job on that race in my boat. And the vane shades my stern panels more than I'd like. In so doing, I laid myself open to a potential severe problem in the event of limited solar power and engine failure. So I carry a small gasoline powered generator for peace of mind. Have used it, but never really had to. Life involves choices at every level, it seems,

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    San Francisco Bay Area
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    Jackie, go bolt that thing to the transom and learn how to use it! If you're going to sail more distance than your battery can run your autopilot, then have spare parts for the Navik.
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanH View Post
    Jackie, go bolt that thing to the transom and learn how to use it! If you're going to sail more distance than your battery can run your autopilot, then have spare parts for the Navik.
    Come up and help me bolt it on, then we can go out and practice. I want to have it in place for the Half Moon Bay race and certainly for Drakes Bay (cuz it's so far away!).
    Last edited by Philpott; 02-25-2015 at 06:13 PM.

  6. #36
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    Sep 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philpott View Post
    Come up and help me bolt it on, then we can go out and practice. I want to have it in place for the Half Moon Bay race and certainly for Drakes Bay (cuz it's so far away!).
    Hmmm...tempting. Let me look at my calendar...
    S-2 7.9: "Wildcat of Loch Awe"
    1968 Selmer Series 9 B-flat and A clarinets
    1962Buesher "Aristocrat" tenor saxophone
    Piper One Design 24, Hull #35; "Alpha"

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alameda CA
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    375

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    For what its worth, it actually is fairly easy to find spare Navik parts... these guys are in Holland, but super easy to work with.
    they are not OEM parts, but they have replicated them and generally have inventory on all the fiddly little bits.

    http://windvaneselfsteering.com/cont...ik-spare-parts

    best,
    DH

  8. #38
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    Sep 2007
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    Dave, thanks for the reminder about Mister Vee. Has anyone heard anything about their "Y&B" windvane? It sounds robust enough for my boat but it's half the weight of the Monitor due to using modern materials. I just can't put 55# on Rags' transom - I'd need a sissy bar - 24# would be okay though.

    They also sell a "headless" version to use with a tillerpilot, which would work during surfing sessions.
    .
    Last edited by BobJ; 02-26-2015 at 09:42 AM.

  9. #39
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    Jan 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    For what its worth, it actually is fairly easy to find spare Navik parts... these guys are in Holland, but super easy to work with.
    they are not OEM parts, but they have replicated them and generally have inventory on all the fiddly little bits. http://windvaneselfsteering.com/content/navik-spare-parts
    best,DH
    Actually, my experience with Mr Vee was not so helpful. Someone offered to give me a Navik a couple of years ago, but it was missing a paddle. I contacted Mr Vee and he told me that it was not cost effective for him to make only a small batch of one or two. My understanding is that paddles tend to go missing offshore, and it would definitely be a good idea to have one or even two spares. I'm sure a paddle could be fabricated by people who know how to do that sort of thing (Greg Nelsen, Chris @ Svendsen's) but Mr Vee wasn't interested in selling only one or two. And by the way, if someone needs a wheel adapter for his/her Navik, one came with my Navik when I bought it. It has never been used and is in great shape.
    Last edited by Philpott; 02-26-2015 at 09:46 AM.

  10. #40
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    Sep 2007
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    Yes, in fact they do a run of windvane systems just once a year. The farther ahead you order, the larger the discount.

    But spare parts like the paddles/blades should be available year-round. It does make me think about putting my eggs in their basket.

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